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How to train your boss about communications

Mentoring Up: Training Your Boss About Communications Without Alienating Him or Her

NAGC President,  Kathryn Stokes November 15, 2017, 1:00-2:00 p.m. Eastern

Government agencies are rife with political appointees who are put in their positions for a lot of reasons, none of which include their ability to communicate. Often, they have no idea what their new agency does or why. It is up to us as the professional government communicators in our organizations to remedy this situation.

In “Mentoring Up,” NAGC President Kathryn Stokes uses her thirty-plus years of experience, most in the private sector, to show government communicators her tips for “handling” new appointees (without seeming to handle them).

Over her ten years in government service, she has used these techniques to move projects from idea to fruition, gaining the respect and trust of her agency leadership along the way. Kathryn will share discreet ways to not only educate a new leader but to gain her or his confidence. She’ll give us ideas for dealing with folks who feel they do not need help and pass on her own best practices for moving mountains—a little at a time.

Register Now for “Mentoring Up,” Wednesday, November 15.

If you have a question about an upcoming webinar, contact NAGC Headquarters at (703) 538-1787 or info@nagc.com.

NAGC webinar: What internal communicators can learn from the contact center world

E-mailing Customers and Colleagues: What Internal Communicators Can Learn from the Contact Center World

Wed Oct 18 Webinar (1-2pm, ET) from the National Association of Government Communicators

With Leslie O’Flahaven of e-Write

So much e-mail, so little time. You need to get critical agency information into the hands of your colleagues, but their inboxes are inundated. When your messages arrive, they’re rarely opened, let alone read.

What if you took a different approach to your writing? Could you craft messages that will be opened, read, and (hallelujah!) responded to? Yes! By using lessons learned from contact centers, where customer service representatives deal with questions and complaints by using effective subject lines, empathy, integrated online resources, and templates that don’t sound like form letters.

Leslie O’Flahaven will walk us through the steps in NAGC’s October 18 edition of Webinar Wednesday.

Can’t wait ’til then? Check out her online training on lynda.com.

Register now

National Association of Government Communicators offers crisis communications presentation

Join NAGC this Friday October 6th for Encore!

Uprising: A City Divided With Mark Basnight Senior Public Affairs Training Specialist, National Public Affairs Academy, Argonne National Laboratory

In crisis communications, you can’t know what’s coming. But you can look ahead to prepare for the unexpected. And you can look back to learn from what others have been through. At our next Encore! presentation, emergency management communications expert Mark Basnight will walk us through Charlotte, North Carolina’s public response to the riots that broke out just a year ago following the officer-involved death of a local man.

Why was the situation extraordinary?

How did two different narratives emerge?

When did officials begin to respond?

What did Charlotte learn from the division among its citizens?

Mr. Basnight’s session was standing room only at the June Communications School. This is your chance to hear his riveting story and why the lessons learned in Charlotte will be critical to other government communicators in the future.

Register now

IABC regional conference: Heritage Region

The 2017 IABC Heritage Region Conference is fast approaching You can now download the complete conference brochure to review the schedule and learn more about the speakers for this year’s 4 KEYNOTES and 21 BREAKOUT SESSIONS.

Be sure to check out the schedule and explore the complete list of speakers. Join us in one of the “17 Best Places to Travel” in 2017 according to Harper’s Bazaar to:

  • LEARN from some of the best in the field
  • CONNECT through networking opportunities
  • COMMUNICATE with speakers and fellow attendees

There’s still time to register! Visit iabcheritageconference.com to take advantage of low early bird pricing through October 2.

Enter Natl Assn of Govt Communicators Awards Program

Free Webinar: Wednesday, August 16, 2017, 1-2 p.m. Eastern

You’re doing terrific work this year, and one of the top awards in government communications would look beautiful on your desk. We want to help you compete for a NAGC Blue Pencil & Gold Screen Award.

Find out more at our complimentary August edition of Webinar Wednesday. We’ll hear from NAGC Competitions Director S.J. Brown about what’s new for 2017, the competition process, and the benefits of recognition. SJ will also cover:

  • Who earns recognition for their work
  • What the competition looks like
  • When 2017 nominations will be accepted
  • Where to send your nomination packages
  • Why you should enter
  • How you can increase your chances of winning

NAGC’s Blue Pencil & Gold Screen Awards competition is one of the top government leadership competition programs in the country. Our judges see the best work being done by local, state, federal, tribal, and international communicators from every discipline: writing, design, photography, multimedia, social media, and management.

They also face some of their toughest decisions of the year: who earns first place, second place, and awards of excellence in each category. And which agency brings home the top prize of Best in Show.

Find out if your organization has what it takes to enter on our next edition of Webinar Wednesday. And, if you aren’t yet a member, take advantage of this annual cost-free presentation to learn more about NAGC, our professional development offerings, and how you can save money by activating your membership today.

Register now for “The 5 Ws and How of Winning a Blue Pencil & Gold Screen Award”

SEJ’s Fund for Environmental Journalism: Nov 15 deadline for story grant proposals

Mark Your Calendar: Request for Proposals

SEJ’s Fund for Environmental Journalism (FEJ) invests in public service reporting on environment and the journalists who produce it.

November 15, 2017 (midnight local time) is the next deadline for story grant proposals to SEJ’s Fund for Environmental Journalism. FEJ grants will provide up to $5,000 to underwrite stipend for freelancers and budget lines for direct expenses like travel, multi-media production, translation, data sets or document costs.

Calling all donors: Give now to seed more stories. Grants will be awarded in January 2018 to underwrite coverage projects in three categories:

  1. Open Topic: Environmental Issues Made possible by unrestricted gifts and grants to SEJ’s Fund for Environmental Journalism.
  2. Marine and coastal issues of the North Pacific and Arctic Oceans Made possible by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.
  3. Environmental issues of the Amazon and Andes Made possible by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Winning projects will be selected by an independent jury of editors. Preference will be given to projects that include an element of international partnership: journalists and news organizations in different countries working together to report an important story and expand its reach.

Grantees retain full editorial control of FEJ-funded coverage. Donors have no right of review and no influence on story plans made possible in part by their contributions. Binding agreements between donors and the Society of Environmental Journalists and between SEJ and grantees of its Fund for Environmental Journalism reinforce this policy of editorial independence.

SEJ maintains a strict policy of confidentiality with regard to story ideas submitted. The application portal for this FEJ Winter Round of competition is now open.  Applicants will be notified of results in January 2018.

Grantees will be paid and announcements made as soon as SEJ-FEJ Grantee agreements can be finalized. Want a head start on the process? Proposal requirements will include project title, 200-word summary of topic, media dissemination plan and partnership plan (if applicable) and amount requested.

To complete your application you’ll upload PDF documents to include narrative (up to 1,000 words), qualifications, letter of support from editor(s) to publish or broadcast finished work and detailed budget.

See the FEJ guidelines for more information. Then you can fill out an online form and upload your files. Note: SEJ members pay no application fee. Non-member journalists must qualify for SEJ membership and pay online entry fee ($40USD) to apply. Find full details on the Fund for Environmental Journalism here.

National Association of Government Communicators: June 13-15, St. Louis

Here’s some information on NAGC’s Communications School in St. Louis:

Chris O’Neil, Chief of Media Relations for the National Transportation Safety Board, will teach you how to define communication goals, separate strategy from tactics, and effectively use research and evaluation in a half-day advance training workshop at the 2017 NAGC Communications School in St. Louis. “Communications Planning: Defining Success and Setting Goals,” will give you the skills you need to master strategic communications planning. You’ll leave knowing how to align your communications efforts to specific goals of your agency and your department.

And don’t miss “The Role of Government Communicators and Transition in Government.” Chris and John Verrico, Chief of Media Relations of the Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, will lead this panel examining the role of career, professional government communicators during transitions in government leadership.

June 13-15 in St. Louis
National Association of Government Communicators
201 Park Washington Court | Falls Church, VA 22046
www.nagc.com | info@nagc.com | 703.538.1787

Help keep environmental journalism in the spotlight

Four days left to enter the Society of Environmental Journalists Awards for Reporting on the Environment …

Monday, April 3

SEJ offers $500 for first-place winners in seven categories.

But much more than that, SEJ shines a light on environmental reporting.

We live in a time when both journalism and environment are being attacked in the U.S. It’s unprecedented, and it’s more important than ever to recognize the great work being done by journalists who cover environmental issues.

Enter, or enter again, today. And please forward this message to colleagues. Help SEJ keep environmental journalism in the spotlight.

Deadline to enter:
April 3, 11:59PM your local time

I received this from the Authors Guild

UPDATE March 16, 2017:

Our fears have come to pass. You may have seen the news this morning that President Trump’s proposed budget, released earlier today, calls for the elimination of the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities. The budget—which must be passed by Congress—will be the subject of vigorous debate on Capitol Hill in the coming months.

Now is the time to act.

Why You Should Help

The NEA is the only U.S. federal agency that is dedicated to supporting the future of the arts, and especially literature, through its grants to upcoming writers and literary organizations. The NEA and NEH each account for only .003 percent of federal spending and are the only agencies that represent our thriving arts culture. These organizations support countless authors, literary organizations, and artistic endeavors, and are particularly important because they allow the arts to flourish in geographic and economic areas otherwise underserved by the arts.

How You Can Help

1. Sign the Authors Guild’s Letter

The Guild is sending letters to members of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees and we hope to collect as many signatures from you as we can.

2. Contact your Representative

Speak to or write your Congressperson and let them know that cutting funding for the arts, and literature in particular, is not acceptable.

In approximate order of effectiveness, the best ways to make sure your representatives in Congress and the Senate hear you are to:

Meet with them in person. You can contact their office to set up a meeting or, if you are comfortable with doing so, attend a local event where they are speaking and raise your hand and make sure you are heard.
Mail a letter (they are less and less frequently received, so they actually get read!).
Call or write an e-mail.

You may want to mention projects in your state that are funded by the NEA and the NEH.

Feel free to use as much of the from the Authors Guild as you wish, keeping in mind that personalized letters tend to be more effective—but the quantity of letters received is also important.

Bottom line: make sure your voice is heard.

Calling all speakers for IABC Heritage Region Conference

Calling all Speakers!

IABC Heritage Region Seeking Speakers for the 2017 Region Conference being held at the Omni William Penn Hotel, Pittsburgh, PA, November 5-7, 2017

The IABC Heritage Region is currently seeking speakers for the 2017 Regional Conference being held November 5-7 at the Omni William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh. The conference will consist of approximately twenty 75-minute breakout sessions and in-depth 3-hour sessions on key topics affecting today’s business communicators.

The conference draws nearly 200 communicators from the northeastern, midwestern and mid-Atlantic United States, as well as Canada.

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